Promising Practices for Reducing the Risk of Repetitive Strain Injuries in Silviculture Work

What follows here is a brief catalogue of actions we are calling promising practices to deal with reducing the chances of workers developing repetitive strain symptoms in silviculture work. This list draws from strategies individual workers and employers from around the province have developed and are using to deal with losses from overwork and repetition on the job.

MSIPPfinal.docx
MSIPPfinal.pdf

BC SAFE Silviculture Program
21 April 2015

DRAFT

Recommended Promising Practices for Reducing the Risk of Repetitive Strain Injuries

What follows here is a brief catalogue of actions we are calling promising practices to deal with reducing the chances of workers developing repetitive strain symptoms in silviculture work. This list draws from strategies individual workers and employers from around the province have developed and are using to deal with losses from overwork and repetition on the job.

Our short term goal is to share these tactics assuming that because they come from reliable performers on the front lines they are likely positive and beneficial. Our long-term goal is to develop methods to measure beyond the anecdotal to provide more solid evidence these practices work or don’t. We also need some better data on just what conditions lead to problems. With that in mind we are looking for volunteer crews and companies to assist us in establishing better reporting and measures of effectiveness. Please get in touch.

Meanwhile, review this list and compare it to your own practices as a worker or a contractor or a forester. If you are working with most of these already—including perhaps some different ones we’ve missed—as part of your company’s or your own musculoskeletal injury (MSI) reduction strategy then you are among the leaders in the province. If you are not, then consider this an opportunity to improve your performance and reduce possible losses from MSI and repetitive strain.